Have a glass of water with this article

Adults who stay well-hydrated appear to be healthier, develop fewer chronic conditions such as heart and lung disease, and live longer than those who may not get sufficient fluids, according to a National Institutes of Health study released this month.

For those of you in the medical professions, the findings suggest that people with higher levels of sodium in their blood may benefit from a more thorough clinical evaluation of their hydration status, including fluid intake habits and pathological conditions that may predispose to increased water loss.

For the rest of us, let’s make it simple: An extra glass of water here and there can often help. Water helps your body in many ways, including:  keeping a normal body temperature;  lubricating and cushioning joints; protecting your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues; getting rid of wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements.

Additionally, staying well-hydrated may be associated with a reduced risk for developing heart failure, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Your body generally needs more water than usual when you are in hot climates, more physically active, running a fever, or having diarrhea or vomiting.

 

Golden Living is prepared by the Dutchess County Office for the Aging, 114 Delafield St., Poughkeepsie, New York 12601, telephone 845-486-2555, email: ofa@dutchessny.gov website: www.dutchessny.gov/aging

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