Drop-in tea with Millbrook’s mayor — and pet adoption — at the library

First meetings with prospective family pets were the order of a perfect spring day as the Millbrook Library hosted a pet adoption event that drew four animal rescue organizations on Saturday, May 18.

Leila Hawken

Drop-in tea with Millbrook’s mayor — and pet adoption — at the library

MILLBROOK — In addition to the personable Village Mayor Tim Collopy being on hand to chat with residents as part of the Community Tea series sponsored by the Millbrook Library on Saturday, May 18, there was the excitement of a pet adoption fair featuring cautious kittens, boisterous puppies and even chinchillas hoping to find suitable homes.

Those activities, combined with regular Saturday morning library users, made for a busy Saturday at the local library.

Social connection was the goal.

Participating in the second of a series of community teas hosted by the Millbrook Library on Saturday, May 18, was Village Mayor Tim Collopy who began by greeting residents on the porch and later moved inside to be near the indoor action for the library’s pet adoption event.Leila Hawken

Collopy spoke of current projects underway throughout the village including the most major of projects, an upgrade for the present wastewater treatment plant, projected to take three years to complete at a cost of $10 million. Village Trustees are beginning the supplemental infrastructure funding process that requires detailed engineering studies to be completed in the coming months.

Another project, now well underway and visible to residents, is the planting of trees in the village. It has been a four-phase project, Collopy said. Five new trees were recently planted along the south side of Franklin Avenue.

The final phase will see the crosswalk redone where Franklin and Front Streets meet, Collopy noted. As Franklin is a state highway, the work will be done when it can be scheduled.

“It’s a good opportunity to highlight the good work these organizations do,” said Library Director Courtney Tsahalis, pleased with both events as they unfolded.

Chinchillas were a favorite at the pet adoption event held at the Millbrook Library on Saturday, May 18. This as yet unnamed youngster is held by Deana Matero of “My Hope’s in You” Small Animal Rescue of LaGrangeville, one of the participating nonprofit rescue organizations.Provided

Chinchillas, young and very young, were shown off by My Hope’s in You Small Animal Rescue of LaGrangeville. Also showing pets up for adoption were Compassionate Animal Rescue of Dutchess County, Hudson Valley Animal Rescue and Sanctuary of Poughkeepsie, and the Stray Cat Network of Red Hook.

“We’re here to check out the kittens,” one young couple was overheard saying as they headed for the display by the Stray Cat Network. Camryn Lauffer, president of that organization, said that the Millbrook Library event was her first-ever adoption event, since she began her tenure in 2020.

While no one could go home on Saturday with a pet, there were inquiries about the necessary application process and lots of bonding with potential pets loaded with charm.

Bashful young chinchillas drew admiring gazes from kids and parents at the pet adoption event at the Millbrook Library on Saturday, May 18. Freya Hersey, 9, and her sister, Akicita, 6 (almost 7), paused to have a look at the popular display of My Hope’s in You Small Animal Rescue of LaGrangeville.Leila Hawken

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